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Appalachian versus non-Appalachian US traffic fatalities, 2008-2010
Filetype[PDF - 158.79 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    23619016
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3689544
  • Funding:
    R01 HD074594/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    R01HD074594/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    R21CE001820/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
    R49CE001170/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Purpose

    Though myriad health disparities exist in Appalachia, limited research has examined traffic fatalities in the region. This study compared traffic-fatality rates in Appalachia and the non-Appalachian US.

    Methods

    Fatality Analysis Reporting System and Census data from 2008-2010 were used to calculate traffic-fatality rates. Poisson models were used to estimate unadjusted (RR) and adjusted rate ratios (aRR), controlling for age, sex, and county-specific population density levels. Results: The Appalachian traffic-fatality rate was 45% (95% CI: 1.42, 1.47) higher than the non-Appalachian rate. Though only 29% of fatalities occur in rural counties in non-Appalachia versus 48% in Appalachia, rates in rural counties were similar (RR=0.97; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.00). However, the rate for urban, Appalachian counties was 42% (95% CI: 1.38, 1.45) higher than among urban, non-Appalachian counties. Appalachian rates were higher for passenger-vehicle drivers, motorcyclists, and all-terrain-vehicle riders, regardless of rurality, as well as for passenger-vehicle passengers overall and for urban counties. Conversely, Appalachia experienced lower rates among pedestrians and bicyclists, regardless of rurality.

    Conclusions

    Disparities in traffic fatality rates exist in Appalachia. Though elevated rates are partially explained by the proportion of residents living in rural settings, overall rates in urban Appalachia were consistently higher than in urban non-Appalachia.