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EPIDEMIOLOGY OF US HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS-RELATED LIGAMENTOUS ANKLE INJURIES, 2005/06-2010/11
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    23328403
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3640618
  • Description:
    Objective

    Describe ankle injury epidemiology among US high school athletes in 20 sports.

    Design

    Descriptive prospective epidemiology study.

    Setting

    Sports injury data for the 2005/06–2010/11 academic years were collected using an internet-based injury surveillance system, Reporting Information Online (RIO).

    Participants

    A nationwide convenience sample of US high schools.

    Assessment of Risk Factors

    Injuries sustained as a function of sport and gender.

    Main Outcome Measures

    Ankle sprain rates and patterns, outcomes, and mechanisms.

    Results

    From 2005/06–2010/11, certified athletic trainers reported 5,373 ankle sprains in 17,172,376 athlete exposures [AEs], for a rate of 3.13 ankle sprains per 10,000 AEs. Rates were higher for girls than boys (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.17–1.34) in gender-comparable sports and higher in competition than practice for boys (RR 3.42, 95% CI 3.20–3.66) and girls (RR 2.71, 95% CI 2.48–2.95). The anterior talofibular ligament was most commonly injured (involved in 85.3% of sprains). Overall, 49.7% of sprains resulted in loss of participation from 1–6 days. While 0.5% of all ankle sprains required surgery, 6.6% of those involving the deltoid ligament required surgery. Athletes were wearing ankle braces in 10.6% of all sprains. The most common injury mechanism was contact with another person (42.4% of all ankle sprains).

    Conclusions

    Ankle sprains are a serious problem in high school sports, with high rates of recurrent injury and loss of participation from sport.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    KL2 RR025754/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
    KL2 RR025754/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
    R49/CE000674-01/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
    R49/CE001172-01/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
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