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Influenza surveillance report no. 91, 1975-1976
  • Published Date:
    July 1977
Filetype[PDF - 4.53 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Center for Disease Control, Immunization Division ; Center for Disease Control, Bureau of Bureau of Epidemiology., Respiratory and Special Pathogens Branch. ; Center for Disease Control, Bureau of Laboratories., Respiratory Virology Branch. ; ... More ▼
  • Series:
    Influenza surveillance report ; no. 91
    HSS publication ; no. (CDC ) 77-8295
    Morbidity and mortality weekly report ; v. 24 , no. 23, p. 197-198
    Morbidity and mortality weekly report ; v. 25 , no. 36, p. 285-286
    Morbidity and mortality weekly report ; v. 25 , no. 45, p. 356-359
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    I. Summary -- II. Surveillance methods -- III. Surveillance results, 1975-1976 -- IV. Epidemiologic investigations -- V. Worldwide surveillance -- VI. Method for diagnosising influenza -- VII. Guidelines for control of nosocomial influenza -- Appendix: ACIP recommendations, 1976

    "The 1975-1976 influenza season was noteworthy because of several events. a) An H3N2 influenza virus (A/Victoria/3/75), isolated first in April 1975, caused a widespread epidemic late in the influenza season in the United States. Based on pneumonia and influenza-associated mortality which peaked in February and March 1976, this was the most severe epidemic experienced by the United States since the 1968-1969 Hong Kong epidemic. b) In January and February an outbreak of influenza among recruits at Fort Dix, New Jersey, yielded 5 isolates of a virus resembling swine influenza strains. This discovery led to unprecedented investigations and to the recommendation for a nationwide influenza vaccination program in the fall of 1976. Furthermore, influenza surveillance activities were intensified and continued into the summer to search for any other evidence of infection of man by swine influenza-like virus. c) A total of 5 distinct strains of influenza A viruses were isolated in a single season--A/Port Chalmers/l/73, A/Victoria/3/75, A/England/864/75, A/Tokyo/l/75 (all H3N2 strains), and A/New Jersey/8/76, the H1Nl virus from Fort Dix. In the 1975-1976 season the Center for Disease Control (CDC) influenza surveillance data processing for the first time was done by computer. The data processing systems developed this season greatly augmented the capacity for handling multiple types of influenza surveillance data in large amounts from all sections of the United States." p. [1]

    Appendix: ACIP recommendations, 1976, consists of : Recommendation of the Public Health Service Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices: Influenza vaccine - preliminary statement (June 1976; Published MMWR: Vol. 25, No. 21, June 4, 1976); Recommendation of the Public Health Service Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices: Influenza vaccine - supplemental statement (July 1976; Published MMWR: Vol. 25. No. 25, 1976); recommendations of the Committee on Infectious Diseases of the American Academy of Pediatrics: Immunization of children at high risk from influenza infection (Septermber 1976; published in MMWR Vol. 25, No. 36, 1976); and: Recommendation of the Public Health Service Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices: Influenza vaccine - second supplemental statement (November 1976; Published MMWR: Vol. 25. No. 45, 1976)

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files