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Climate change and health – from science to practice
  • Published Date:
    December 16, 2014
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 2.76 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.). Office of the Associate Director for Communication. ; National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (U.S.). Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Bacterial Diseases Branch
. ; 
National Center for Environmental Health (U.S.). Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects.
  • Series:
    Public health grand rounds ; 2014 December 16
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Assessing changes in climate and health [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by George Luber, p. 2-14] -- Climate change effects on health: a multifaceted problem [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by Kim Knowlton, p. 15-33] -- How climate influences the infectious disease landscape [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by C. Ben Beard, p. 34-52] -- Building resiliency for climate change:
 helping states and cities respond [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by George Luber, p. 53-63].

    Image of smog, fires, drought plains, and a mosquito Changes occurring in the world’s climate pose significant threats to human health and wellbeing and will have even greater impacts in the future. These threats are wide-ranging, including decreased air quality and increases in extreme weather events, wildfire, and illnesses transmitted by water, and disease-carriers, such as mosquitoes and ticks. Although scientific understanding of the effects of climate change is still emerging, there is considerable evidence to support preparing for potential health risks.

    Studies have shown that adverse climate events are increasing in both intensity and frequency, contributing to rising rates of illness as well as mortality. Elevated temperatures in the 2003 European heat wave resulted in over 30,000 confirmed heat-related deaths & 70,000 excess deaths from all causes. Flooding has caused billions of dollars of damage and significant loss of life. The populations most vulnerable—children, elderly people, those living in poverty, people living in certain geographic areas and people with underlying health conditions—are at even greater health risk from climate change.

    Planning for climate change provides opportunities to protect human health and well-being across many sectors. Early public health action is essential to ensuring that systems are in place to protect people from the impacts of climate change. As the nation's public health agency, CDC is using its prevention expertise to help states and cities investigate, prepare for, and respond to the health effects of climate change.

    This session of Grand Rounds will explore the wide-ranging health impact of our changing climate and discuss some of the strategies, programs and partnerships currently being used to confront the challenges associated with global climate change.

    Public Health Grand Rounds held on Tuesday, December 16, 2014, at 1pm EST.

    Presented by: George Luber, PhD, Associate Director for Climate Change, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects
, National Center for Environmental Health, CDC
 [“Assessing Changes in Climate and Health” and “Building Resiliency for Climate Change:
Helping States and Cities Respond”]; Kim Knowlton, DrPH
, Assistant Clinical Professor of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; 
Senior Scientist and Co-Deputy Director, Health and Environment Program, 
Natural Resources Defense Council [
“Climate Change Effects on Health: A Multifaceted Problem”]; C. Ben Beard, PhD
, Associate Director for Climate Change, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases
, Chief, Bacterial Diseases Branch
, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC
 [“How Climate Influences the Infectious Disease Landscape”].

    Facilitated by: John Iskander, MD, MPH, Scientific Director, Public Health Grand Rounds; Phoebe Thorpe, MD, MPH, Deputy Scientific Director, Public Health Grand Rounds; Susan Laird, MSN, RN, Communications Manager, Public Health Grand Rounds.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files