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Evaluation toolkit : Patient and provider perspectives about routine HIV screening in health care settings
  • Published Date:
    March 2012
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 1.69 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.) ; François-Xavier Bagnoud Center. ; University of California, San Francisco. Center for AIDS Prevention Studies.
  • Description:
    In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published the Revised Recommendations for HIV Testing of Adults, Adolescents and Pregnant Women in Health Care Settings (Branson, Handsfield, et al. 2006). CDC recommends routine HIV screening in health care settings using an opt-out approach in order to increase the number of patients being screened for HIV infection, detect HIV infection earlier and link patients with unrecognized HIV infection to clinical and prevention services.

    To reduce barriers to HIV screening and make HIV tests similar to other types of health screenings, CDC recommends that separate written consent and prevention counseling should not be required with diagnostic testing or screening programs.

    The implementation of routine HIV screening requires a change in practice for most health care settings and may involve new types of testing procedures, such as point-of-care rapid HIV tests as opposed to laboratory-based HIV testing procedures. As part of implementation, health care settings may collect a range of statistics about their testing program, such as the number of patients screened, percentage of preliminary positive tests, proportion of those with preliminary positive results undergoing confirmatory testing, and percent of confirmed positives linked successfully to care. These statistics, while important, do not provide information on patient or provider perspectives about routine HIV screening in health care settings, including patient satisfaction with and acceptance of HIV screening.

    This guide was developed through a cooperative agreement between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies at the University of California, San Francisco and the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center in the School of Nursing, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.

    Suggested citation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Evaluation Toolkit: Patient and Provider Perspectives about Routine HIV Screening in Health Care Settings. http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/testing/ healthcare/index.htm. Published March 2012. Accessed [date].

    CS228316

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