Progress on children eating more fruit, not vegetables
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.

Search our Collections & Repository

All these words:

For very narrow results

This exact word or phrase:

When looking for a specific result

Any of these words:

Best used for discovery & interchangable words

None of these words:

Recommended to be used in conjunction with other fields

Language:

Dates

Publication Date Range:

to

Document Data

Title:

Document Type:

Library

Collection:

Series:

People

Author:

Help
Clear All

Query Builder

Query box

Help
Clear All

For additional assistance using the Custom Query please check out our Help Page

i

Progress on children eating more fruit, not vegetables

Filetype[PDF-3.23 MB]


  • English

  • Details:

    • Description:
      The amount of whole fruit children, 2-18 years old, ate increased by 67% from 2003 to 2010 and replaced fruit juice as the main contributor of fruit to children’s diets. Experts recommend that most fruit come from whole fruit, rather than juice. The amount of vegetables children ate did not change from 2003 to 2010. Moreover, in 2007- 2010, children did not meet recommendations for the amount of fruit and vegetables they should eat.

      About 60 million US children are enrolled in child care or school, where their experiences with food can affect their health and lifelong food choices. Since 2010, new national efforts like Let’s Move! and new school nutrition standards support healthy eating. About 60 million US children are enrolled in child care or school, where their experiences with food can affect their health and lifelong food choices. Since 2010, new national efforts like Let’s Move! and new school nutrition standards support healthy eating.

      Child care, schools, and school districts can support these efforts by: Meeting or exceeding current federal nutrition standards for meals and snacks; Serving fruit and vegetables whenever food is offered; Training staff to make fruit and vegetables more appealing and accessible; Offering nutrition education and hands-on learning opportunities, such as growing, tasting, and preparing fruit and vegetables.

      CS249608A

    • Place as Subject:
    • Main Document Checksum:
    • File Type:

    Supporting Files

    • No Additional Files

    More +

    You May Also Like

    Checkout today's featured content at stacks.cdc.gov