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CDC influenza surveillance report no. 46, April 7, 1959
  • Published Date:
    April 7, 1959
Filetype[PDF-2.40 MB]


Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Communicable Disease Center (U.S.), Influenza Surveillance Unit.
  • Description:
    I. Summary of information -- II. Current analysis of influenza in the United States -- III. International notes -- IV. Influenza nomenclature -- Current analysis of influenza and pneumonia mortality

    "Influenza and pneumonia deaths reported from 108 United States cities remained at approximately the level, normal for the season, of the past six weeks. All Divisions remained close to or below the normal thresholds except the Middle Atlantic. This Division showed an increase in deaths to 181 from the levels of the previous six weeks which ranged between 130 and 157 deaths. The increasing influenza and pneumonia mortality of the past three weeks on New York City (see page 4) appears to be the primary cause of this Divisional increase. Through the first, week of April 1959 the Influenza Surveillance Unit has received reports of influenza-like illness causing outbreaks and increased school absenteeism in 29 States and the District of Columbia. Sixteen States and the District have now confirmed the presence of influenza Type B within their States. Asian (A2) influenza has been reported only from California, New York, and Florida. As in past weeks industrial absentee rates remain normal for the season, and there have been few reports of outbreaks primarily affecting adults. This report includes a summary of the international status of influenza during the period from January 1 to March 31, 1959. Thirteen countries have now confirmed the presence of Asian (A2) influenza, while Type B has been detected in eleven countries; and Type C in two. Nine other countries have experienced outbreaks of influenza-like illness but have not confirmed them to be due to influenza. At this writing South America, the Middle East, Australia, and most of Africa appear to have been free of influenza since January although the absence of a report from a county or continent does not necessarily imply that there has been no influenza in that area. Part IV of this report presents a brief discussion of the status of the Type A influenza classification situation." - p. 2

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