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Epidemiologic profile 2010 : Asians and native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders
  • Published Date:
    8/13/12
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 1.97 MB]


Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (U.S.)
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    This Epidemiologic Profile is the first compilation of infectious disease-specific data in a single report that focuses on two racial groups in the United States: the Asian population and the Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population. It has been produced by the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and each Division represented in the National Center participated in the development of the report. The U.S. Census Bureau contributed to the chapter that describes Asian and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander populations who reside in the United States.

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), viral hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and tuberculosis (TB) share common risk factors, intersect as co-infections, and interact to increase transmission and complicate treatment. Men who have sex with men are at high risk for acquiring STDs and HIV. Persons who inject drugs and share their syringes are at risk for acquiring HIV and viral hepatitis. And TB takes advantage of a person’s impaired ability to fight infection or of poor living conditions to spread from person to person. A person infected with one disease may increase their chance of becoming infected with another disease (i.e., co-infection). For example, STDs that cause skin ulceration or mucosal inflammation allow HIV infection to occur more easily. Longstanding, untreated HIV infection is associated with waning immunity and increased risk of TB infection. Additionally, co-infection may make treating the primary infection more difficult. Viral hepatitis complicates HIV co-infection as both diseases progress faster, and treatment may be more difficult as drug-drug interactions may occur or drug resistance may develop.

    Although Asians and Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders currently comprise about 5% of the U.S. population, the percentage of Asians and Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders among persons with these selected diseases varies dramatically. For example, for hepatitis B and tuberculosis, Asians make up a disproportionately large percentage of cases (~25%), in excess of their representation in the U.S. population. For STDs and HIV, Asians and Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders comprise a small percentage of cases (<5%), less than their representation in the U.S. population.

    Suggested citation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. Epidemiologic Profile 2010: Asians and Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2012.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files