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Mortality Trends and Disparities Among Racial/Ethnic and Sex Subgroups in New York City, 1990 to 2000
Filetype[PDF - 311.25 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    20411331
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3088827
  • Description:
    New York City census data for 1990 and 2000 for all-cause and disease-specific mortality adjusted by age were examined by race/ethnicity. Primary cause of death was coded as HIV/AIDS, cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, or cancer. For White, Black, Hispanic and Asian groups, relative mortality ratios (RMR) were derived for 2000 relative to 1990. Ratios of RMR's for minority groups were derived relative to Whites. From 1990 to 2000, HIV, cancer, CVD, CHD, AMI, and stroke-related mortality decreased. Decreases in HIV-related mortality were notably less for minority males. Diabetes mortality rates rose dramatically, with Hispanic and Asian males having notably greater increases than White males. Increases in mortality among Asians exceeded those of other groups, and appear to correspond with increased immigration/acculturation. Mortality shifts among different diseases and racial groups should alert public health officials to consider immigration patterns in designing, implementing, and evaluating interventions to prevent disease-related mortality, with a goal to eliminate disparities.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    1U48DP001904/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    5 P60 MD000514-06/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS/United States
    P60 MD000514-06/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS/United States
    P60 MD000538/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS/United States
    R24MD001786/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS/United States
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