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Tuberculosis control laws and policies : a handbook for public health and legal practitioners
  • Published Date:
    October 1, 2009
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 2.12 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.). Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis. ; Centers for Law and the Public’s Health. ; National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (U.S.). Division of Tuberculosis Elimination. ; ... More ▼
  • Description:
    Acknowledgment -- Funding -- Disclaimer -- Table of abbreviations -- I. Introduction -- II. Essentials of TB Control in Public Health Practice -- III. Basic Legal Framework for Communicable Disease Control -- IV. Communicable Disease Control Law -- V. Express TB Control Laws -- VI. Selected Legal Issues in TB Control Law -- VII. Tools to Assess TB Control Laws -- References and notes.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – through its Division of Tuberculosis Elimination (DTBE) and its Public Health Law Program (PHLP) – has identified legal preparedness as a critical component in the control of many public health threats, including TB.1 With support from CDC and guidance from the National Tuberculosis Controllers Association (NTCA), the Centers for Law and the Public’s Health: A Collaborative at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities (Center) created this Handbook for use by tribal, state, and local public health practitioners and their legal counsel to help improve their understanding and use of relevant laws to respond to challenges concerning TB control.

    Some states and localities have already developed informative resources for the control of TB in their jurisdictions, as noted in Table 1 (Resources on Communicable Disease and TB Control Methods in Selected U.S. Jurisdictions). Some of these materials, such as Virginia’s TB Control Laws Guidebook and the California Public Health Institute’s report, TB Control Law, focus specifically on legal preparedness for TB control. However, most of these resources examine public health practice issues concerning communicable diseases, including TB, but feature little or no discussion of legal issues. A number of federal resources on TB control are also available on CDC DTBE’s website,2 including a 1993 MMWR report on state TB control laws and recommendations developed by the Advisory Council for the Elimination of TB (ACET).

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide a practical source of information on laws related to TB control to help public health practitioners and their legal counsel to: (1) understand the legal environment for the control of communicable diseases, including TB; (2) identify and explain legal issues in TB control; and (3) consider the use of tools for improving TB control. The Handbook is not designed to provide specific legal guidance or advice, and does not represent the official legal positions of federal, state, tribal, or local governments. Users should contact their legal advisors for legal guidance concerning the scope and extent of public health laws in any jurisdiction.

    Disclaimer – Information in this Handbook does not represent the official legal positions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/HHS, or state or local governments, and is not meant to provide specific legal guidance or advice. Users of this Handbook, including state and local officials, should consult with their state and local attorneys and legal advisors for specific legal guidance concerning the scope and extent of public health laws in their jurisdiction.

    The Center’s development of this Handbook was sponsored by CDC’s Public Health Law Program, Office of Strategy and Innovation, with financial support under CDC Cooperative Agreement U50/CCU319118.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – through its Division of Tuberculosis Elimination (DTBE) and its Public Health Law Program (PHLP) – has identified legal preparedness as a critical component in the control of many public health threats, including TB.1 With support from CDC and guidance from the National Tuberculosis Controllers Association (NTCA), the Centers for Law and the Public’s Health: A Collaborative at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities (Center) created this Handbook for use by tribal, state, and local public health practitioners and their legal counsel to help improve their understanding and use of relevant laws to respond to challenges concerning TB control.

    Some states and localities have already developed informative resources for the control of TB in their jurisdictions, as noted in Table 1 (Resources on Communicable Disease and TB Control Methods in Selected U.S. Jurisdictions). Some of these materials, such as Virginia’s TB Control Laws Guidebook and the California Public Health Institute’s report, TB Control Law, focus specifically on legal preparedness for TB control. However, most of these resources examine public health practice issues concerning communicable diseases, including TB, but feature little or no discussion of legal issues. A number of federal resources on TB control are also available on CDC DTBE’s website,2 including a 1993 MMWR report on state TB control laws and recommendations developed by the Advisory Council for the Elimination of TB (ACET).

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide a practical source of information on laws related to TB control to help public health practitioners and their legal counsel to: (1) understand the legal environment for the control of communicable diseases, including TB; (2) identify and explain legal issues in TB control; and (3) consider the use of tools for improving TB control. The Handbook is not designed to provide specific legal guidance or advice, and does not represent the official legal positions of federal, state, tribal, or local governments. Users should contact their legal advisors for legal guidance concerning the scope and extent of public health laws in any jurisdiction.

    Disclaimer – Information in this Handbook does not represent the official legal positions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/HHS, or state or local governments, and is not meant to provide specific legal guidance or advice. Users of this Handbook, including state and local officials, should consult with their state and local attorneys and legal advisors for specific legal guidance concerning the scope and extent of public health laws in their jurisdiction.

    The Center’s development of this Handbook was sponsored by CDC’s Public Health Law Program, Office of Strategy and Innovation, with financial support under CDC Cooperative Agreement U50/CCU319118.

  • Document Type:
  • Funding:
    U50/CCU319118
  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
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