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Lifestyle Behaviors and Physician Advice for Change Among Overweight and Obese Adults With Prediabetes and Diabetes in the United States, 2006
  • Published Date:
    Oct 17 2011
  • Source:
    Prev Chronic Dis. 2011; 8(6).
Filetype[PDF - 545.01 KB]


Details:
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Introduction

    The objective of this study was to examine the lifestyle behaviors of overweight and obese people with prediabetes or diabetes and to determine whether an association exists between reported behaviors and physician advice for behavior change.

    Methods

    This investigation included overweight and obese people (body mass index ≥25.0 kg/m2) with prediabetes and diabetes aged 40 years or older identified from the 2006 National Health Interview Survey. Respondents reported attempts to control or lose weight, reduce the amount of fat or calories in their diet, and increase physical activity. Respondents also reported receipt of a physician recommendation for behavioral change in 1 or more of these areas. Data analysis included use of logistic regression stratified by sex and prediabetes/diabetes status to model odds of behavior by physician advice.

    Results

    Most people reported trying to control or lose weight (prediabetes, 82%; diabetes, 75%). Fewer identified efforts to reduce the amount of fat or calories in their diet (prediabetes, 62%; diabetes, 71%) or increase physical activity (prediabetes, 53%; diabetes, 57%). Approximately one-third reported not receiving physician advice for each of these behavior changes. In logistic regression, physician advice for reducing the amount of fat or calories in the diet and increasing physical activity was generally associated with the reported corresponding behavior.

    Conclusion

    Many respondents reported trying to control or lose weight, but fewer reported actually reducing fat or calories in their diet or increasing physical activity. Physician advice may influence attempts at behavior change among overweight and obese patients with prediabetes and diabetes.