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Mortality of Urban Aboriginal Adults in Canada, 1991–2001**This article is part of a joint publication initiative between Preventing Chronic Disease and Chronic Diseases in Canada. Preventing Chronic Disease is the secondary publisher, while Chronic Diseases in Canada is the primary publisher.
  • Published Date:
    Dec 15 2010
  • Source:
    Prev Chronic Dis. 8(1).
Filetype[PDF - 144.89 KB]


Details:
  • Description:
    Objective

    To compare mortality patterns for urban Aboriginal adults with those of urban non-Aboriginal adults.

    Methods

    Using the 1991–2001 Canadian census mortality follow-up study, our study tracked mortality to December 31, 2001, among a 15% sample of adults, including 16 300 Aboriginal and 2 062 700 non-Aboriginal persons residing in urban areas on June 4, 1991. The Aboriginal population was defined by ethnic origin (ancestry), Registered Indian status and/or membership in an Indian band or First Nation, since the 1991 census did not collect information on Aboriginal identity.

    Results

    Compared to urban non-Aboriginal men and women, remaining life expectancy at age 25 years was 4.7 years and 6.5 years shorter for urban Aboriginal men and women, respectively. Mortality rate ratios for urban Aboriginal men and women were particularly elevated for alcohol-related deaths, motor vehicle accidents and infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS. For most causes of death, urban Aboriginal adults had higher mortality rates compared to other urban residents. Socio-economic status played an important role in explaining these disparities.

    Conclusion

    Results from this study help fill a data gap on mortality information of urban Aboriginal people of Canada.

    Keywords

    Aboriginal people, First Nations, Métis, Inuit, North American Indians, age-standardized mortality rates, mortality rate, life expectancy

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