Welcome to CDC Stacks | Are Diet and Physical Activity Patterns Related to Cigarette Smoking in Adolescents? Findings From Project EAT - 20137 | Preventing Chronic Disease | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Are Diet and Physical Activity Patterns Related to Cigarette Smoking in Adolescents? Findings From Project EAT
  • Published Date:
    Jun 15 2007
  • Source:
    Prev Chronic Dis. 2007; 4(3).
Filetype[PDF - 1.20 MB]


Details:
  • Funding:
    MCJ-270834/PHS HHS/United States
    T01-DP000112/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Introduction

    An inadequate diet and physical inactivity may compound the many deleterious effects of smoking on health. Some research indicates that smoking behavior is related to other health behaviors, but little research has examined how smoking may be related to dietary intake of key nutrients, consumption of fast food, sedentary lifestyle, or weight status. The purpose of this study was to describe smoking frequency among adolescents and its relationship to physical activity and dietary patterns.

    Methods

    The research study employed a cross-sectional, population-based design. Adolescents self-reported cigarette smoking, physical activity, and eating behaviors on the Project EAT (Eating Among Teens) survey and reported dietary intake on a food frequency questionnaire completed in school classrooms. The sample included 4746 middle school and high school students from Minneapolis-St. Paul public schools. Mixed-model regression, which was controlled for sex, race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status, grade level (middle school or high school), and school, was used to examine the association of smoking with diet and physical activity patterns.

    Results

    Overall, reported smoking frequency was inversely related to participating in team sports, eating regular meals, and consuming healthful foods and nutrients. Smoking frequency was directly related to frequency of fast-food and soft drink consumption.

    Conclusion

    Adolescents who smoke cigarettes may be less likely to engage in health-promoting lifestyle behaviors. Interventions are needed to prevent smoking and the unhealthy dietary practices and physical activity behaviors that may be associated with it.