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Gastric Bypass Surgeries in New Hampshire, 1996-2007
  • Published Date:
    Mar 15 2012
  • Source:
    Prev Chronic Dis. 2012; 9.
Filetype[PDF - 165.79 KB]


Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Pubmed ID:
    22420315
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3372985
  • Funding:
    U58 DP000798-01/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Introduction

    Obesity is a national epidemic. Gastric bypass surgery may be the only option that provides significant long-term weight loss for people who are morbidly obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥40 kg/m2) or for people who have a BMI of 35 or higher and have an obesity-related comorbidity. The objective of this study was to assess trends in gastric bypass surgery in New Hampshire.

    Methods

    Data from 1996 to 2007 from the New Hampshire Inpatient Hospital Discharge data set were analyzed. Records for patients with a gastric bypass surgery code were identified, and data on patients and hospitalizations were collected. A joinpoint regression model was used to analyze trends in surgery rates. Differences between patients and payer types were analyzed by using the Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel χ2 test.

    Results

    The annual rate of gastric bypass surgery increased significantly from 3.3 to 22.4 per 100,000 adults between 1996 and 2007. The in-hospital death rate decreased significantly from 11% in 1996 to 1% in 2007. A greater proportion of women (78.1% during the study period) than men had this surgery. The average charge of a surgery decreased significantly from $44,484 in 1996 to $43,907 in 2007; by 2007, total annual charges were $13.9 million. Since 1996, private or "other" payers have been charged for nearly 80% of the total discharges.

    Conclusion

    The number of gastric bypass surgeries has increased in New Hampshire, and so have their cost. These increases may reflect a shortage in effective primary care and preventive measures to address the obesity epidemic.