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Special Hazard Review With Control Recommendations for 4,4'-Methylinebis(2-chloroaniline)
  • Published Date:
    September 1978
  • Status:
    current
Filetype[PDF - 1.05 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    From the toxicologic information presented in Appendix 1 and the preceding information update, a profile of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline)'s potentially hazardous properties can be developed. 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) possesses the general toxicity characteristics of aromatic amines, and may, if introduced into the human body, produce cyanosis from methemoglobin formation. From an occupational health standpoint, there is greater concern for 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline)'s carcinogenic potential, evidence for which comes primarily from animal bioassays as well as in vitro mutagenicity studies. Results reported by five independent groups of investigators clearly demonstrate 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) to be oncogenic in the rat, mouse, and dog. Ingestion of daily doses of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) by mice and rats has resulted in the appearance of cancers of the liver, kidneys, lungs, skin, and mammary glands (II, Appendix I). Subcutaneous injection of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) in rats produced liver and lung cancer in both sexes (Appendix I). Urinary bladder cancer was produced in female beagle dogs fed doses of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) which varied from 8 to 15 mg/kg body weight per day for up to 9 years. Further, 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) is mutagenic in in vitro tests utilizing Salmonella bacteria.

    Based on positive oncogenic results in three animal test species, NIOSH recommends that 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) be treated as a potential occupational carcinogen.From the toxicologic information presented in Appendix 1 and the preceding information update, a profile of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline)'s potentially hazardous properties can be developed. 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) possesses the general toxicity characteristics of aromatic amines, and may, if introduced into the human body, produce cyanosis from methemoglobin formation. From an occupational health standpoint, there is greater concern for 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline)'s carcinogenic potential, evidence for which comes primarily from animal bioassays as well as in vitro mutagenicity studies. Results reported by five independent groups of investigators clearly demonstrate 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) to be oncogenic in the rat, mouse, and dog. Ingestion of daily doses of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) by mice and rats has resulted in the appearance of cancers of the liver, kidneys, lungs, skin, and mammary glands (II, Appendix I). Subcutaneous injection of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) in rats produced liver and lung cancer in both sexes (Appendix I). Urinary bladder cancer was produced in female beagle dogs fed doses of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) which varied from 8 to 15 mg/kg body weight per day for up to 9 years. Further, 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) is mutagenic in in vitro tests utilizing Salmonella bacteria.

    Based on positive oncogenic results in three animal test species, NIOSH recommends that 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) be treated as a potential occupational carcinogen.From the toxicologic information presented in Appendix 1 and the preceding information update, a profile of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline)'s potentially hazardous properties can be developed. 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) possesses the general toxicity characteristics of aromatic amines, and may, if introduced into the human body, produce cyanosis from methemoglobin formation. From an occupational health standpoint, there is greater concern for 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline)'s carcinogenic potential, evidence for which comes primarily from animal bioassays as well as in vitro mutagenicity studies. Results reported by five independent groups of investigators clearly demonstrate 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) to be oncogenic in the rat, mouse, and dog. Ingestion of daily doses of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) by mice and rats has resulted in the appearance of cancers of the liver, kidneys, lungs, skin, and mammary glands (II, Appendix I). Subcutaneous injection of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) in rats produced liver and lung cancer in both sexes (Appendix I). Urinary bladder cancer was produced in female beagle dogs fed doses of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) which varied from 8 to 15 mg/kg body weight per day for up to 9 years. Further, 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) is mutagenic in in vitro tests utilizing Salmonella bacteria.

    Based on positive oncogenic results in three animal test species, NIOSH recommends that 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) be treated as a potential occupational carcinogen.From the toxicologic information presented in Appendix 1 and the preceding information update, a profile of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline)'s potentially hazardous properties can be developed. 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) possesses the general toxicity characteristics of aromatic amines, and may, if introduced into the human body, produce cyanosis from methemoglobin formation. From an occupational health standpoint, there is greater concern for 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline)'s carcinogenic potential, evidence for which comes primarily from animal bioassays as well as in vitro mutagenicity studies. Results reported by five independent groups of investigators clearly demonstrate 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) to be oncogenic in the rat, mouse, and dog. Ingestion of daily doses of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) by mice and rats has resulted in the appearance of cancers of the liver, kidneys, lungs, skin, and mammary glands (II, Appendix I). Subcutaneous injection of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) in rats produced liver and lung cancer in both sexes (Appendix I). Urinary bladder cancer was produced in female beagle dogs fed doses of 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) which varied from 8 to 15 mg/kg body weight per day for up to 9 years. Further, 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) is mutagenic in in vitro tests utilizing Salmonella bacteria.

    Based on positive oncogenic results in three animal test species, NIOSH recommends that 4,4'-Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline) be treated as a potential occupational carcinogen.

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