Surveillance for Health Care Access and Health Services Use, Adults Aged 18–64 Years — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2014
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Surveillance for Health Care Access and Health Services Use, Adults Aged 18–64 Years — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2014

Filetype[PDF-1.04 MB]


English

Details:

  • Alternative Title:
    MMWR Surveill Summ
  • Personal Author:
  • Description:
    Problem/Condition

    As a result of the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, millions of U.S. adults attained health insurance coverage. However, millions of adults remain uninsured or underinsured. Compared with adults without barriers to health care, adults who lack health insurance coverage, have coverage gaps, or skip or delay care because of limited personal finances might face increased risk for poor physical and mental health and premature mortality.

    Period Covered

    2014.

    Description of System

    The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an ongoing, state-based, landline- and cellular-telephone survey of noninstitutionalized adults aged ≥18 years residing in the United States. Data are collected from states, the District of Columbia, and participating U.S. territories on health risk behaviors, chronic health conditions, health care access, and use of clinical preventive services (CPS). An optional Health Care Access module was included in the 2014 BRFSS.

    Results

    In 2014, health insurance coverage and other health care access measures varied substantially by state, state Medicaid expansion status, expanded geographic region (i.e., states categorized geographically into nine regions), and FPL category. The following proportions refer to the range of estimated prevalence for health insurance and other health care access measures by examined geographical unit (unless otherwise specified), as reported by respondents. Among adults with health insurance coverage, the range was 70.8%–94.5% for states, 78.8%–94.5% for Medicaid expansion states, 70.8%–89.1% for nonexpansion states, 73.3%–91.0% for expanded geographic regions, and 64.2%–95.8% for FPL categories. Among adults who had a usual source of health care, the range was 57.2%–86.6% for states, 57.2%–86.6% for Medicaid expansion states, 61.8%–83.9% for nonexpansion states, 64.4%–83.6% for expanded geographic regions, and 61.0%–81.6% for FPL categories. Among adults who received a routine checkup, the range was 52.1%–75.5% for states, 56.0%–75.5% for Medicaid expansion states, 52.1%–71.1% for nonexpansion states, 56.8%–70.2% for expanded geographic regions, and 59.9%–69.2% for FPL categories. Among adults who had unmet health care need because of cost, the range was 8.0%–23.1% for states, 8.0%–21.9% for Medicaid expansion states, 11.9%–23.1% for nonexpansion states, 11.6%–20.3% for expanded geographic regions, and 5.3%–32.9% for FPL categories. Estimated prevalence of cancer screenings, influenza vaccination, and having ever been tested for human immunodeficiency virus also varied by state, state Medicaid expansion status, expanded geographic region, and FPL category.

    Interpretation

    This report presents for the first time estimates of population-based health care access and use of CPS among adults aged 18–64 years. The findings in this report indicate substantial variations in health insurance coverage; other health care access measures; and use of CPS by state, state Medicaid expansion status, expanded geographic region, and FPL category. In 2014, health insurance coverage, having a usual source of care, having a routine checkup, and not experiencing unmet health care need because of cost were higher among adults living below the poverty level (i.e., household income <100% of FPL) in states that expanded Medicaid than in states that did not. Similarly, estimates of breast and cervical cancer screening and influenza vaccination were higher among adults living below the poverty level in states that expanded Medicaid than in states that did not. These disparities might be due to larger differences to begin with, decreased disparities in Medicaid expansion states versus nonexpansion states, or increased disparities in nonexpansion states.

    Public Health Action

    BRFSS data from 2014 can be used as a baseline by which to assess and monitor changes that might occur after 2014 resulting from programs and policies designed to increase access to health care, reduce health disparities, and improve the health of the adult population. Post-2014 changes in health care access, such as source of health insurance coverage, attainment and continuity of coverage, financial barriers, preventive care services, and health outcomes, can be monitored using these baseline estimates.

  • Subjects:
  • Source:
  • Pubmed ID:
    28231239
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5829627
  • Document Type:
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