National chlamydia screening rate in young sexually active women using HEDIS measures in the United States, 2011–2020
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National chlamydia screening rate in young sexually active women using HEDIS measures in the United States, 2011–2020



Public Access Version Available on: July 01, 2024, 12:00 AM
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English

Details:

  • Alternative Title:
    Sex Transm Dis
  • Personal Author:
  • Description:
    Background:

    National guidelines recommend sexually active women under the age of 25 be screened annually for chlamydia. Our objective was to estimate the chlamydia screening rate of sexually active women aged 16–24 years from 2011–2020.

    Methods:

    We analyzed the chlamydia screening rates among sexually active women aged 16–24 from 2011–2020 using the chlamydia measures in the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) dataset. The annual national chlamydia screening rates was further stratified by census region and by patient age.

    Results:

    Chlamydia screening rates among sexually active women aged 16–24 years ranged from 55.0% to 61.8% in Medicaid health plans and from 46.9% to 52.4% in commercial health plans during 2011–2020. The Northeast consistently had the highest screening rates among 4 geographic regions. The chlamydia screening rate among sexually active women aged 16–24 years decreased from 2019 to 2020: from 61.8% to 57.9% in Medicaid plans and from 52.4% to 48.4% in commercial health plans. The number of sexually active women aged 16–24 covered by commercial health plans decreased from 2019 to 2020, but the number covered by Medicaid increased from 2019 to 2020.

    Conclusion:

    The chlamydia screening rates in the target population have increased little from 2011–2019. The decrease in chlamydia screening rates between 2019 and 2020 could be related to the COVID-19 pandemic and the reduced use of health services during that period. With recently suboptimal chlamydia screening rates in the United States, interventions of improving and assessing chlamydia screening rates are needed.

  • Keywords:
  • Source:
  • Pubmed ID:
    36943794
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC10613457
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