Prevalence of Experiencing Physical, Emotional, and Sexual Violence by a Current Intimate Partner during Pregnancy: Population-based Estimates from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System
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Prevalence of Experiencing Physical, Emotional, and Sexual Violence by a Current Intimate Partner during Pregnancy: Population-based Estimates from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System

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English

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  • Alternative Title:
    J Fam Violence
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  • Description:
    Intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy presents a risk for maternal mental health problems, preterm birth, and having a low birthweight infant. We assessed the prevalence of self-reported physical, emotional, and sexual violence during pregnancy by a current partner among women with a recent live birth. We analyzed data from the 2016-2018 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System in six states to calculate weighted prevalence estimates and 95% confidence intervals for experiences of violence by demographic characteristics, health care utilization, and selected risk factors. Overall, 5.7% of women reported any type of violence during pregnancy. Emotional violence was most prevalent (5.4%), followed by physical violence (1.5%), and sexual violence (0.9%). Among women who reported any violence, 67.6% reported one type of violence, 26.5% reported two types, and 6.0% reported three types. Reporting any violence was highest among women using marijuana or illicit substances, experiencing pre-pregnancy physical violence, reporting depression, reporting an unwanted pregnancy, and experiencing relationship problems such as getting divorced, separated, or arguing frequently with their partner. There was no difference in report of discussions with prenatal care providers by experience of violence. The majority of women did not report experiencing violence, however among those who did emotional violence was most frequently reported. Assessment for IPV is important, and health care providers can play an important role in screening. Coordinated prevention efforts to reduce the occurrence of IPV and community-wide resources are needed to ensure that pregnant women receive needed services and protection.
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  • Pubmed ID:
    37205924
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC10193455
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