Welcome to CDC Stacks | Estimating the permeation resistance of nonporous barrier polymers to sulfur mustard (HD) and sarin (GB) chemical warfare agents using liquid simulants - 11749 | Stephen B. Thacker CDC Library collection
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Estimating the permeation resistance of nonporous barrier polymers to sulfur mustard (HD) and sarin (GB) chemical warfare agents using liquid simulants
  • Published Date:
    July 2008
Filetype[PDF - 2.04 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory ; National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ;
  • Series:
    DHHS publication ; no. (NIOSH) 2008-141
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    1. Introduction -- 2. Procedures and Results -- 3. Discussion. -- 4. Summary -- References -- Bibliography: Application of solvent-solute parameters and solubility phase diagrams to chemical defense, unlimited distribution publications -- Appendix A: Standard test method for estimating permeation resistance of nonporous barrier polymers to liquid chemical warfare agents (GB and HD) using liquid simulants -- Appendix B: Liquid permeation cell mechanical drawings -- Appendix C: CWA permeation tables

    "The purpose of this document is to report the results of the NIOSH Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) Simulant Project that had the following goals: 1.) Identify chemicals (simulants) that simulate the permeation of Sarin (GB) and sulfur mustard (HD) through elastomeric barrier materials that are commonly used in respirators. 2.) Develop a convenient and reliable laboratory procedure (test method) that can be used by Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) manufacturers for estimating GB and HD permeation rates through barrier materials using the simulants. PPE manufacturers can use this method to screen and deselect candidate barrier materials during product development testing. Advancements in this research can benefit the first responder community by providing PPE manufacturers with information and testing techniques that will reduce the time and resources needed to engineer products that weigh less, have better permeation resistance, are less cumbersome, and could potentially be less expensive." - NIOSHTIC-2

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files