Intimate Partner Violence Experienced by Adults With Diagnosed HIV in the U.S.
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Intimate Partner Violence Experienced by Adults With Diagnosed HIV in the U.S.

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  • English

  • Details:

    • Alternative Title:
      Am J Prev Med
    • Description:
      Introduction: Intimate partner violence is associated with adverse health consequences among people with diagnosed HIV, which could have implications for disease progression and transmission. However, nationally representative estimates of intimate partner violence among people with diagnosed HIV are lacking. Investigators used nationally representative data to estimate the prevalence of physical violence by an intimate partner among adults with diagnosed HIV and examine the differences by selected characteristics. Methods: This analysis included interview and medical record data from the 2015–2017 cycles of the Medical Monitoring Project, analyzed in 2019. Weighted percentages and 95% CIs were used to report the prevalence of intimate partner violence among people with diagnosed HIV (N=11,768). Bivariate and multivariate differences in intimate partner violence by sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics were examined using Rao–Scott chi-square tests (p<0.05). Results: Among people with diagnosed HIV, 26.3% reported having ever experienced intimate partner violence, and 4.4% reported having experienced intimate partner violence in the past 12 months. The prevalence of intimate partner violence differed by gender and gender/sexual identity. People who experienced intimate partner violence in the past 12 months were more likely to engage in behaviors associated with elevated HIV transmission risk and have unmet needs for supportive services. People who recently experienced intimate partner violence were less likely to be engaged in routine HIV care but were more likely to seek emergency care services and have poor HIV clinical outcomes. Conclusions: This study’s findings support the need for screening people with diagnosed HIV for intimate partner violence and offering linkage to supportive services. Screening for intimate partner violence among people with diagnosed HIV, coupled with supportive services and counseling, may lead to improved safety and HIV clinical outcomes and decreased need for emergency and inpatient medical services.
    • Pubmed ID:
      33812695
    • Pubmed Central ID:
      PMC8591529
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