Assessing Impact of HPV Vaccination on Cervical Cancer Incidence in Women 15–29 years in the United States, 1999–2017: An Ecologic Study
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Assessing Impact of HPV Vaccination on Cervical Cancer Incidence in Women 15–29 years in the United States, 1999–2017: An Ecologic Study
  • Published Date:

    October 20 2020

  • Source:
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 30(1):30-37
  • Language:
    English


Public Access Version Available on: July 01, 2021, 12:00 AM information icon
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Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
  • Description:
    Background: To date, the impact of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine on invasive cervical cancers in the United States has not been documented due, in part, to the time needed for cancer to develop, and to recent changes to cervical cancer screening guidelines and recommendations which complicate data interpretation. Methods: We examined incidence rates of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (AC) among women aged 15–29 years diagnosed during 1999–2017 using population-based cancer registry data covering 97.8% of the US population. Trends were stratified by age and histology. The annual percent change in cervical cancer incidence per year was calculated using Joinpoint regression. Results: During 1999–2017, SCC rates decreased 7.9% per year among women aged 15–20 years, 5.5% among women aged 21–24 years, and 2.3% among women aged 25–29 years. The declines in SCC rates were largest among women aged 15–20 years from 2011 to 2017, with a decrease of 22.5% per year. Overall, AC rates decreased 4.1% per year among women aged 15–20 years, 3.6% per year among women aged 21–24 years, and 1.6% per year among women 25–29 years. AC rates declined the most among women aged 15–20 years during 2005 to 2017, decreasing 11.2% per year. Conclusions: Since HPV vaccine introduction, both SCC and AC incidence rates declined among women aged 15–20 years, a group not typically screened for cervical cancer, which may suggest HPV vaccine impact. Impact: Timely vaccination and improved screening and follow-up among recommended age groups could result in further reductions in invasive cervical cancer.
  • Pubmed ID:
    33082207
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC7855406
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