Lifetime History of Traumatic Brain Injury With Loss of Consciousness and the Likelihood for Lifetime Depression and Risk Behaviors: 2017 BRFSS North Carolina
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Lifetime History of Traumatic Brain Injury With Loss of Consciousness and the Likelihood for Lifetime Depression and Risk Behaviors: 2017 BRFSS North Carolina
  • Published Date:

    2021 Jan-Feb 01

  • Source:
    J Head Trauma Rehabil. 36(1):E40-E49
  • Language:
    English


Public Access Version Available on: January 01, 2022, 12:00 AM information icon
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Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    J Head Trauma Rehabil
  • Description:
    Objective: Because of the growing concern about the potential effects of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) on a child’s developing brain and the potential impact of lifetime depression and risk behaviors associated with TBI, further exploration is warranted. Setting and Participants: Data (N = 4917) from the 2017 North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System (BRFSS). Design: Cross-sectional. Main Measures: Examine whether a lifetime history of TBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) or having a history of TBI with LOC prior to 18 years of age was associated with a greater likelihood of lifetime depression, current binge drinking, and current cigarette and e-cigarette smoking. Results: Respondents with a history of TBI with LOC had 2.1 (95% CI, 1.6–2.8) times higher odds of lifetime depression and 1.7 to 1.8 (95% CI, 1.02–2.97) times higher odds of all risk behaviors than those without a lifetime history of TBI with LOC. There were no statistical differences between age of first TBI with LOC and lifetime depression, binge drinking, cigarette smoking, and e-cigarette use after controlling for key demographics. Conclusion: These findings underscore the importance of increasing awareness among healthcare providers of the prevalence of lifetime depression and risk behaviors among individuals with a history of TBI and the need for improved screening and referrals to evidence-based services.
  • Pubmed ID:
    32769836
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC7769859
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