A human component to consider in your emergency management plans: the critical incident stress factor; The Holmes Safety Association Bulletin August 1998
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A human component to consider in your emergency management plans: the critical incident stress factor; The Holmes Safety Association Bulletin August 1998

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    In recent years the issue of human stress response in emergency workers has begun to receive attention. This paper presents a rationale for considering human stress as a significant factor in the management of emergencies It discusses the concept of stress, Critical Incident Stress in emergency responders, and intro¬duces the Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD) process. It is suggested that in a disaster, the CISD process can improve the effectiveness of response teams on site, their turnaround time on site, and post disaster time off the job. This paper, prepared by a US Bureau of Mines research psychologist, offers some ideas to the mining industry in general, mine rescue trainers and more universally, to those responsible for developing emergency management plans.
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