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Methodologies; Analysis of Mine Fires for All US Underground and Surface Coal Mining Categories 1990-1999
  • Published Date:
    1/1/2004
Filetype[PDF - 134.62 KB]


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  • Description:
    For all coal mining categories, data on coal mine fires during 1990-1999 have been reported as actual numbers and calculated values. 1. For each mining category, actual numbers include the total number of fires, fire injuries, employees' working hours, lost workdays, and coal production (for underground and surface mines only) for a 1 0-year period (1 990- 1999) and for five successive 2-year periods with the 10-year period. These numbers have also been reported by state ( 10-year period). The actual number of fire fatalities has been reported by time period. Furthermore, actual numbers of fires for the five 2-year periods have been reported by ignition source, method of detection and suppression, equipment involved, location, and burning material. Actual numbers of fire injuries per number of fires causing injuries and total fires have been reported by year, ignition source, equipment involved, and location. 2. For each mining category, the calculated values include the fire and injury risk rates during the 10-year period and the five 2-year periods. The fire risk rate (Frr) values were calculated according to the USBM formula [Pornroy and Carigiet 19951. The injury risk rate (Irr) values were calculated according to the MSHA formula [MSHA 1991a, 1992, 1993, 1994a, 1995a, 1996, 1997, 1998b, 1999c, 20001. Also, risk rate values for individual states (10-year period) were calculated according to the above-mentioned formulas. Of note is that only the risk rate values for the 10-year and five 2-year periods and risk rate values for individual states with the highest number of fires and fue injuries were considered for comparison purposes. The fatality risk rate values were not calculated because of the extremely small number of fire fatalities during the 1 0-year period. 3. Calculations of risk rate values are as follows: a. Fire risk rate (Frr) value: Number of fires per million tons of coal produced [Pornroy and Carigiet 19951. b. Injury risk rate (Irr) value: Number of fire injuries multiplied by 200,000 working hours per total employees' working hours [MSHA 1991a, l992,1993,1994a, 1995a, 1996, 1997, 1998b, 1999c, 20001. The Irr value is the average risk rate value for the number of fire injuries per 200,000 working hours for a given time period.

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