Welcome to CDC stacks |
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Notifiable disease surveillance and notifiable disease statistics--United States, June 1946 and June 1996
  • Published Date:
    June 28, 1996
  • Source:
    MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1996 Jun 28;45(25):530-6.
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-133.96 KB]


Details:
  • Description:
    National surveillance for infectious diseases is used to document the morbidity and impact associated with these conditions in the United States. This report includes morbidity data for the weeks ending June 8, 1946, and June 22, 1996, and described changes since 1946 both in the procedure for conducting surveillance and in the incidence of selected diseases. National surveillance for infectious diseases is used to document the morbidity and impact associated with these conditions in the United States. This report includes morbidity data for the weeks ending June 8, 1946, and June 22, 1996, and describes changes since 1946 both in the procedures for conducting surveillance and in the incidence of selected diseases. Surveillance Notes The history of the reporting and tracking of diseases that could pose a risk to public health in the United States dates back more than a century. In 1878, Congress authorized the U.S. Marine Hospital Service (the forerunner of today's Public Health Service {PHS}) to collect morbidity reports on cholera, smallpox, plague, and yellow fever from U.S. consuls overseas; this information was used to institute quarantine measures to prevent the introduction and spread of these diseases into the United States. In 1879, a specific Congressional appropriation was made for collecting and publishing reports of these notifiable diseases. The authority for weekly reporting and publication was expanded by Congress in 1893 to include data from states and municipal authorities. By 1928, all states, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico were reporting 29 infectious diseases to the Surgeon General. Fifty years ago, morbidity statistics published each week were accompanied by the statement "No health department, State or local, can effectively prevent or control disease without knowledge of when, where, and under what conditions cases are occurring." These statistics appeared under the heading "Prevalence of Disease -- United States" in each issue of Public Health Reports printed by PHS, Office of the Surgeon General (Division of Public Health Methods) (see pages 533-6). In 1949, the collection, compilation, and publication of these morbidity statistics was transferred to the National Office of Vital Statistics, which produced the Weekly Morbidity Report. In 1952 the publication was renamed Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, and responsibility for the publication was transferred to CDC in 1961.
  • Document Type:
  • Place as Subject:
  • Main Document Checksum:
  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
No Related Documents.
You May Also Like: