Prevalence of and Trends in Dyslipidemia and Blood Pressure Among US Children and Adolescents, 1999–2012
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All
i


Prevalence of and Trends in Dyslipidemia and Blood Pressure Among US Children and Adolescents, 1999–2012

Filetype[PDF-99.93 KB]


  • English

  • Details:

    • Alternative Title:
      JAMA Pediatr
    • Description:
      IMPORTANCE Recent national data suggest there were improvements in serum lipid concentrations among US children and adolescents between 1988 and 2010 but an increase in or stable blood pressure (BP) during a similar period. OBJECTIVE To describe the prevalence of and trends in dyslipidemia and adverse BP among US children and adolescents. DESIGN The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a cross-sectional survey. SETTING Noninstitutionalized US population. PARTICIPANTS Children and adolescents aged 8 to 17 years with measured lipid concentrations (n = 1482) and BP (n = 1665). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Adverse concentrations of total cholesterol (TC) (≥200 mg/dL), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (<40 mg/dL), and non-HDL-C (≥145 mg/dL) (to convert TC, HDL-C, and non-HDL-C to millimoles per liter, multiply by 0.0259) and high or borderline BP were examined. Definitions of BP were informed by the Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents by the National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. Analyses of linear trends in dyslipidemias and BP were conducted overall and separately by sex across 7 periods (1999–2000, 2001–2002, 2003–2004, 2005–2006, 2007–2008, 2009–2010, and 2011–2012). RESULTS In 2011–2012, 20.2% (95% CI, 16.3–24.6) of youths had an adverse concentration of TC, HDL-C, or non-HDL-C and 11.0% (95% CI, 8.8–13.4) had either high or borderline BP. The prevalences of adverse concentrations decreased between 1999–2000 and 2011–2012 for TC (10.6% [95% CI, 8.3–13.2] vs 7.8% [95% CI, 5.7–10.4]; P = .006), HDL-C (17.9% [95% CI, 15.0–21.0] vs 12.8% [95% CI, 9.8–16.2]; P = .003), and non-HDL-C (13.6% [95% CI, 11.3–16.2] vs 8.4% [95% CI, 5.9–11.5]; P < .001). There was a decrease in high BP between 1999–2000 (3.0% [95% CI, 2.0–4.3]) and 2011–2012 (1.6% [95% CI, 1.0–2.4]) (P = .003). There was no change from 1999–2000 to 2011–2012 in borderline high BP (7.6% [95% CI, 5.8–9.8] vs 9.4% [95% CI, 7.2–11.9]; P = .90) or either high or borderline high BP (10.6% [8.4–13.1] vs 11.0% [95% CI, 8.8–13.4]; P = .26). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In 2011–2012, approximately 1 in 5 children and adolescents aged 8 to 17 years had an adverse lipid concentration of TC, HDL-C, or non-HDL-C and slightly more than 1 in 10 had either borderline high or high BP. The prevalence of dyslipidemia modestly decreased between 1999–2000 and 2011–2012, but either high or borderline high BP remained stable. The reasons for these trends require further study.
    • Source:
      JAMA Pediatr. 169(3):272-279
    • Pubmed ID:
      25599372
    • Pubmed Central ID:
      PMC7423159
    • Document Type:
    • Place as Subject:
    • Collection(s):
    • Main Document Checksum:
    • File Type:

    Supporting Files

    More +

    You May Also Like

    Checkout today's featured content at stacks.cdc.gov