The association of nativity/length of residence and cardiovascular disease risk factors in the United States
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
i

Superseded

This Document Has Been Replaced By:

i

Retired

This Document Has Been Retired

i

Up-to-date Information

This is the latest update:

The association of nativity/length of residence and cardiovascular disease risk factors in the United States
  • Published Date:

    November 09 2019

  • Source:
    Prev Med. 130:105893
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-471.29 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Prev Med
  • Description:
    Differences by nativity status for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors have been previously reported. Recent research has focused on understanding how other acculturation factors, such as length of residence, affect health behaviors and outcomes. This study examines the association between CVD risk factors and nativity/length of US residence. Using cross-sectional data from 15,965 adults in the 2011-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (analyzed in 2018), prevalence ratios and predicted marginals from logistic regression models are used to estimate associations of CVD risk factors (i.e., hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, overweight/obesity and smoking) with nativity/length of residence (<15 years, ≥15 years) in the US. In sex-, age-, education- and race and Hispanic origin- adjusted analyses, a higher percentage of US (50 states and District of Columbia) born adults (86.4%) had ≥1 CVD risk factor compared to non-US born residents in the US <15 years (80.1%) but not ≥15 years (85.1%). Compared to US born counterparts, regardless of length of residence, hypertension overall and smoking among non-Hispanic white and Hispanic adults were lower among non-US born residents. Overweight/obesity overall and diabetes among Hispanic adults were lower among non-US born residents in the US <15 years. In contrast, non-US born non-Hispanic Asian residents in the US <15 years had higher prevalence of diabetes. Non-US born adults were less likely to have most CVD risk factors compared to US born adults regardless of length of residence, although, for smoking and diabetes this pattern differed by race and Hispanic origin.
  • Pubmed ID:
    31715217
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC7340142
  • Document Type:
  • Place as Subject:
  • Main Document Checksum:
  • File Type:
No Related Documents.

You May Also Like: