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Prevalence of tooth loss among older adults : United States, 2015–2018
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    Key findings -- Did the prevalence of any past or present HBV infection differ by sex, race and Hispanic origin, or U.S. birth status? -- Did the prevalence of hepatitis B vaccination differ by sex, race and Hispanic origin, or U.S. birth status? -- What was the trend in the prevalence of any past or present HBV infection? -- What was the trend in the prevalence of hepatitis B vaccination? -- Summary -- Definitions -- Data source and methods -- About the authors -- References -- Suggested citation.

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    • Prevalence of complete tooth loss among adults aged 65 and over was 12.9% and increased with age: 8.9% (ages 65–69), 10.6% (ages 70–74), and 17.8% (ages 75 and over).

    • Non-Hispanic black older adults (25.4%) had a higher prevalence of complete tooth loss than Hispanic (15.3%) and non-Hispanic white (10.9%) older adults.

    • Prevalence of complete tooth loss was higher for older adults with less than a high school education (31.9%) compared with those with a high school education or greater (9.5%).

    • From 1999–2000 through 2017–2018, the age-adjusted prevalence of complete tooth loss among all older adults declined significantly.

    Complete tooth loss can diminish quality of life, limiting food choices and impeding social interaction (1). Reducing complete tooth loss is a national health goal monitored by Healthy People; although prevalence has decreased since the 1960s, disparities persist (2–4). Factors leading to complete tooth loss—untreated dental caries, periodontitis, and smoking—are preventable and differ by socioeconomic status and between men and women (5,6). This report examines disparities in complete tooth loss among U.S. adults aged 65 and over by sex, age, race and Hispanic origin, and education in 2015–2018 and trends from 1999–2000 through 2017–2018.

    Suggested citation: Fleming E, Afful J, Griffin SO. Prevalence of tooth loss among older adults: United States, 2015–2018. NCHS Data Brief, no 368. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2020.

    CS316978

    db368-h.pdf

  • Content Notes:
    Key findings -- What was the prevalence of complete tooth loss among older adults in 2015–2018? -- What were the differences in the prevalence of complete tooth loss among older adults by race and Hispanic origin in 2015–2018? -- What were the differences in the prevalence of complete tooth loss among older adults by education level in 2015–2018? -- What were the age-adjusted trends in complete tooth loss among older adults from 1999–2000 through 2017–2018? -- Summary -- Definitions -- Data source and methods -- About the authors -- References -- Suggested citation.
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