Welcome to CDC Stacks | Part Three - Estimates Of Miner Location Accuracy: Error Analysis In Seismic Location Procedures For Trapped Miners - I. Summary; Survey Of Electromagnetic And Seismic Noise Related To Mine Rescue Communications - Volume II - 8850 | National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
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Part Three - Estimates Of Miner Location Accuracy: Error Analysis In Seismic Location Procedures For Trapped Miners - I. Summary; Survey Of Electromagnetic And Seismic Noise Related To Mine Rescue Communications - Volume II
  • Published Date:
    1/1/1974
Filetype[PDF - 1.07 MB]


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  • Description:
    A method of error analysis has been applied to the location technique of non-linear least squares iterative inversion in order to evaluate the resolving power of several seismic array configurations with various assumed earth models and errors and inaccuracies in arrival times. The results obtained demonstrate that lateral accuracies of location are improved significantly when the depth of the miner is known. Lateral location to within 100 feet appears achievable in many instances. If it is possible to refine earth models significantly beyond what has normally been assumed in this work by the use of on-site data, or if the mine is shallow (300 feet or less), accuracies of-about 30 feet or so may be attainable. Inaccuracies in earth models of about 5% are found to contribute much more heavily to these location inaccuracies than errors of a few milliseconds in picking arrival times; however, arrival time errors of 15-20 ms or above will dominate these model inaccuracies. The expected accuracy of location is found to fall off very rapidly as the miner moves outside the array. The strength of this effect depends markedly upon the geometry of the array configuration and can be reduced by careful design. Also, as the size of the array is increased, expected location errors within the array are not altered much, but continue to match the error associated with the smaller array over a larger area (assuming that all stations can still pick up the miner's signals). Better location accuracy, especially with respect to depth control is achievable in an earth where the velocity is depth-dependent (increasing with depth) than in one which is homogeneous. This is an advantage since the

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