Dial Down Dust And Noise Exposure
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Dial Down Dust And Noise Exposure

  • 07/01/2007

  • Source: Aggreg Manag 2007 Jul; 12(7):50-53
Filetype[PDF-1.50 MB]


  • English

  • Details:

    • Description:
      Open-Structure Designs May Lower Worker Exposure Levels In Aggregate Operations.

      Many different types of structures and materials have been used to build mineral processing facilities throughout the years. Although structure type and building material were not viewed as significant factors affecting the health of employees in these facilities when they were built, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has found that building type can impact respirable dust and noise levels. NIOSH performed a study in which it evaluated three building types: masonry, an open-structure design, and a steel-sided design. This study indicated that an open-structure design (no walls) was superior from both a dust and noise (health) standpoint when compared to the other two structure types. Therefore, companies may want to consider this design when building new structures.

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