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The Consequences Of ‘Leaky’ Enclosures
  • Published Date:
    0/1/1900
Filetype[PDF - 1.73 MB]


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  • Description:
    From an engineering perspective an ideal industrial noise control solution focuses directly on the actual source of the poise. Eliminating the noise-generating mechanism altogether obviates the need for other noise contra l treatments or hearing protection devices. However, in cases where attenuating the source is not feasible engineering controls must be oriented toward blocking the path that the sound waves travel toward employees. Acoustical enclosures are commonly used as sound path treatments to contain the noise from a machine: alternatively a control room/booth or equipment operator's cab may be used to isolate the worker from the noise. Anyone who has successfully used acoustical enclosures knows that the design procurement, and installation process is deceptively simple. Alt too often First-time efforts fait to account for many of the constraints that can render the enclosure essentially useless. Things that cannot be overlooked include: providing convenient worker access (physical and visual): allowing for proper machine operation/product flow; and supplying fresh air or preventing undue heat or contaminate build-up inside the enclosure. All of these factors must be given careful consideration, otherwise the enclosure will not perform adequately.

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