Multi-Axis Hand-Arm Vibration Testing & Simulation At The National Institute Of Industrial Health, Kawasaki, Japan - Introduction; Proceedings Of The First American Conference On Human Vibration
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Multi-Axis Hand-Arm Vibration Testing & Simulation At The National Institute Of Industrial Health, Kawasaki, Japan - Introduction; Proceedings Of The First American Conference On Human Vibration

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      Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS) was identified as early as 1918 in Bedford, Indiana in the U.S. Since then much research work has been done around the world in the areas of medical, epidemiological, engineering and legal aspects of HAVS. In Japan, much of the pioneering work in this field has been performed by Dr. Setsuo Maeda and his staff at the National Institute of Industrial Health (NIIH) in Kawasaki. Most recently, reports of work done by this group and by Dr. Ren Dong1 of NIOSH in the U.S., as well as many other suppliers and Japanese practitioners were presented at the 13th Japan Group Meeting on Human Response to Vibration held in Osaka2 during August 3-5, 2005. [ ]
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