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Hypertension and Diabetes in Non-Pregnant Women of Reproductive Age in the United States
  • Published Date:
    October 24 2019
  • Source:
    Prev Chronic Dis. 16
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-328.72 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Prev Chronic Dis
  • Description:
    Introduction

    Diagnosis and control of chronic conditions have implications for women’s health and are major contributing factors to maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. This study estimated the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes in non-pregnant women of reproductive age in the United States, the proportion who were unaware of their condition or whose condition was not controlled, and differences in the prevalence of these conditions by selected characteristics.

    Methods

    We used data from the 2011–2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to estimate overall prevalence of hypertension and diabetes among women of reproductive age (aged 20–44 y), the proportion who were unaware of having hypertension or diabetes, and the proportion whose diabetes or hypertension was not controlled. We used logistic regression models to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios to assess differences by selected characteristics.

    Results

    The estimated prevalence of hypertension was 9.3% overall. Among those with hypertension, 16.9% were unaware of their hypertension status and 40.7% had uncontrolled hypertension. Among women with diabetes, almost 30% had undiagnosed diabetes, and among those with diagnosed diabetes, the condition was not controlled in 51.5%.

    Conclusion

    This analysis improves our understanding of the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes among women of reproductive age and may facilitate opportunities to improve awareness and control of these conditions, reduce disparities in women’s health, and improve birth outcomes.

  • Pubmed ID:
    31651378
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC6824149
  • Document Type:
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