Welcome to CDC stacks |
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Racial/Ethnic Differences in Diabetes Screening and Hyperglycemia Among US Women After Gestational Diabetes
  • Published Date:
    October 24 2019
  • Source:
    Prev Chronic Dis. 16
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-332.85 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Prev Chronic Dis
  • Description:
    Introduction

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is the most common complication of pregnancy and is associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Racial/ethnic minority populations are at a higher risk than non-Hispanic white populations of developing type 2 diabetes after GDM. The aim of this study was to describe racial/ethnic differences in hyperglycemia and receipt of screening services in a nationally representative sample of women with a history of GDM.

    Methods

    Our sample included 765 women from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007–2016) with a history of GDM. We used logistic, multinomial, linear, and proportional hazards regression to evaluate racial/ethnic differences in development of diabetes after GDM, hyperglycemia (measured by HbA1c), and receipt of diabetes screening services.

    Results

    Non-Hispanic black women had 63% higher risk and Hispanic women and “other” racial/ethnic women had more than double the risk for diabetes compared with non-Hispanic white women. Among women with a GDM history who did not receive a diagnosis of diabetes by the time of the study examination, both non-Hispanic black women and Hispanic women were more likely than non-Hispanic white women to be in the prediabetes or diabetes range (measured HbA1c ≥5.7%). However, non-Hispanic black women had 2.07 (95% confidence interval, 1.29–3.81) times the odds of being screened for diabetes compared with non-Hispanic white women (P = .02).

    Conclusion

    Delays in identification of hyperglycemia and diagnosis of diabetes in racial/ethnic minority women may reflect differential delivery of guideline-based care or poor follow-up of abnormal screening test results.

  • Pubmed ID:
    31651379
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC6824147
  • Document Type:
  • Main Document Checksum:
No Related Documents.
You May Also Like: