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Trends in apolipoprotein B, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for adults aged 20 and over, 2005–2016
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    Objectives—Guidelines for lowering cholesterol have focused on total and low- density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL–C). Although the emphasis remains on LDL–C, more attention is now being given to apolipoprotein B (apo B) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL–C). This report presents trends in mean apo B, non-HDL–C, and LDL–C in adults aged 20 and over from 2005–2006 through 2015–2016.

    Methods—Data from the 2005–2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were used to conduct trend analyses. Means and standard errors of the mean for apo B (n = 13,802), non-HDL–C (n = 30,921), and LDL–C (n = 13,559) are presented overall and by sex, stratified by age, race and Hispanic origin, and body mass index (BMI) category for each 2-year survey cycle. Trends over time were tested using orthogonal contrast matrices and piecewise and multiple linear regression.

    Results—In men, apo B declined from 98 mg/dL in 2005–2006 to 93 mg/dL in 2011–2012, but did not change after 2011–2012. Declining trends were also seen

    for men in non-HDL–C (147 to 141 mg/dL) and LDL–C (116 to 114 mg/dL) from 2005–2006 to 2015–2016. For women, age-adjusted mean apo B declined from

    94 mg/dL in 2005–2006 to 91 mg/dL in 2015–2016. Non-HDL–C and LDL–C in women did not change significantly from 2005–2006 to 2011–2012, but non-HDL–C declined from 141 mg/dL in 2011–2012 to 133 mg/dL in 2015–2016, and LDL–C declined from 117 mg/dL in 2011–2012 to 111 mg/dL in 2015–2016. With the exception of LDL–C in men, these trends persisted after controlling for age, race and Hispanic origin, BMI, and lipid-lowering medication use.

    Conclusions—From 2005–2006 to 2015–2016, significant but different declining trends in apo B, non-HDL–C, and LDL–C were seen in men and women. In general, differences in age, race and Hispanic origin, BMI category, and lipid-lowering medication use did not explain the trends.

    Suggested citation: Carroll MD, Kruszon-Moran D, Tolliver E. Trends in apolipoprotein B, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for adults aged 20 and over, 2005–2016. National Health Statistics Reports; no 127. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2019.

    CS309775

    nhsr127-508.pdf

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