Workplace Interventions and Vaccination-Related Attitudes Associated With Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Healthcare Personnel Working in Long-Term Care Facilities, 2015–2016 Influenza Season
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Workplace Interventions and Vaccination-Related Attitudes Associated With Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Healthcare Personnel Working in Long-Term Care Facilities, 2015–2016 Influenza Season
  • Published Date:

    January 30 2019

  • Source:
    J Am Med Dir Assoc. 20(6):718-724
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-354.16 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    J Am Med Dir Assoc
  • Description:
    Objectives: Influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel working in long-term care (LTC) facilities can reduce influenza-related morbidity and mortality among healthcare personnel and among resident populations who are at increased risk for complications from influenza and who may respond poorly to vaccination. The objective of this study was to investigate workplace interventions and healthcare personnel vaccination-related attitudes associated with higher influenza vaccination coverage among healthcare personnel working in LTC facilities. Setting and participants: Data were obtained from an online survey of healthcare personnel conducted in April 2016 among a nonprobability sample of 2258 healthcare personnel recruited from 2 preexisting national opt-in Internet panels. Respondents were asked about influenza vaccination status, workplace vaccination policies and interventions, and their attitudes toward vaccination. Analyses were restricted to the 332 healthcare personnel who worked in nursing homes, assisted living facilities, or other LTC facilities. Measures: Logistic regression models were used to assess the independent associations between each workplace intervention and higher influenza vaccination coverage compared with referent levels, controlling for occupation, age, and race/ethnicity. Prevalence ratios were calculated under the assumption of simple random sampling. Results: Approximately 77% of healthcare personnel working in LTC facilities reported receiving influenza vaccination in the 2015–2016 influenza season. Influenza vaccination was independently associated with an employer vaccination requirement (prevalence ratio (PR) [95% confidence interval] = 1.28 [1.11, 1.47]), being offered free onsite vaccination (PR = 1.20 [1.04, 1.39]), and employers publicizing vaccination coverage level to employees (PR = 1.24 [1.09, 1.41]). Vaccination was most highly associated with a combination of 3 or more workplace interventions. Most healthcare personnel working in LTC facilities reported positive attitudes toward the safety and effectiveness of influenza vaccination. Conclusions/Implications: Implementing employer vaccination interventions in LTC facilities, including employer vaccination requirements and free on-site influenza vaccination that is actively promoted, could increase influenza vaccination among healthcare personnel.
  • Pubmed ID:
    30711462
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC6538419
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