From the CDC a qualitative study of middle and high school professionals’ experiences and views on concussion: Identifying opportunities to support the return to school process
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From the CDC a qualitative study of middle and high school professionals’ experiences and views on concussion: Identifying opportunities to support the return to school process
  • Published Date:

    November 03 2018

  • Source:
    J Safety Res. 68:223-229
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-321.52 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    J Safety Res
  • Description:
    Introduction: Current research recommends that students returning to school after a concussion should receive a return to school plan that is tailored to their individual symptoms. School professionals play important roles in designing and implementing the supports outlined in return to school plans. Methods: This qualitative study explored middle and high school professionals’ experiences with concussion, particularly their knowledge and perceptions of the injury and their experience with supporting students with concussion. Six focus groups were conducted with two to four school professionals per group, including two groups of teachers, two groups of school psychologists and counselors, and two groups of school nurses. Findings were coded into four categories: (a) challenges with identifying a concussion; (b) strategies for communicating with students about concussion; (c) barriers to implementing return to learn plans; and (d) establishing a collaborative school support team. Results: School professionals who participated in the focus groups were knowledgeable about concussion and the importance of helping their student recover. Participants also understood the importance of recognizing the signs and symptoms of concussion and communicating with students and parents about this injury. However, the study participants reported various challenges related to concussion identification and management, including the perceived validity of concussion symptom reporting by students. A team-based approach was mentioned across all groups as the preferred method for school-based concussion management for students. Conclusion: School professionals in this study were eager to address concussion in their schools, but desire guidance on how to overcome social norms around concussion identification and reporting. In addition, there is a need for consistent use of written instructions from healthcare providers to help guide return to learn (RTL) accommodations. Practical applications: The findings from this study can help inform the integration of concussion, and other health, management plans in schools.
  • Pubmed ID:
    30876515
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC6460470
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