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Paid sick leave benefits, influenza vaccination, and taking sick days due to influenza-like illness among U.S. workers
  • Published Date:
    October 22 2018
  • Source:
    Vaccine. 36(48):7316-7323
  • Language:
    English


Public Access Version Available on: November 19, 2019 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    30361122
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC6433122
  • Description:
    Introduction:

    Staying home when sick can reduce the spread of influenza. The objectives of this study were to quantify the percentage of workers who had paid sick leave (PSL) benefits, examine sociodemographic characteristics that may be associated with having these benefits, and examine the association between having PSL benefits and use of sick days and influenza vaccination status.

    Methods:

    The public-use dataset from the 2009 National H1N1 Flu Survey (NHFS) were analyzed in 2017. Wald chi-square tests and t-tests were used to test for associations between having PSL benefits and sociodemographic characteristics and industry and occupation groups, the associations between having PSL benefits and seeking treatment when sick with influenza-like illness (ILI), and taking days off work when sick with ILI. Logistic regression was used to determine variables associated with having PSL benefits and the association between having PSL benefits and influenza vaccination status.

    Results:

    Sixty-one percent of employed adults reported having PSL benefits during the 2009–10 influenza season. Being younger, female, Hispanic, less educated, or a farm/blue collar worker were associated with reduced likelihood of having PSL benefits. Not having PSL benefits was associated with a lower likelihood of receiving an influenza vaccination and visiting a health professional when sick with ILI.

    Conclusions:

    The percentage of workers who have PSL benefits differs by sociodemographic characteristics and industry/occupation groups. Offering PSL benefits along with promoting influenza vaccination and encouraging employees with ILI to stay home can increase influenza vaccination coverage and help control the spread of influenza.

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