Welcome to CDC Stacks | Surveillance for lyme disease--United States, 1992-1998 and Surveillance for influenza--United States, 1994-95, 1995-96, and 1996-97 seasons - 7068 | Stephen B. Thacker CDC Library collection
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Surveillance for lyme disease--United States, 1992-1998 and Surveillance for influenza--United States, 1994-95, 1995-96, and 1996-97 seasons
  • Published Date:
    April 28, 2000
Filetype[PDF - 1.21 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.) ; National Center for Infectious Diseases (U.S.), Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases. ; National Center for Infectious Diseases (U.S.), Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases.
  • Description:
    Surveillance for lyme disease--United States, 1992-1998 / Kathleen A. Orloski, Edward B. Hayes, Grant L. Campbell, David T. Dennis, Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases -- Surveillance for influenza--United States, 1994-95, 1995-96, and 1996-97 seasons / T. Lynnette Brammer, Hector S. Izurieta, Keiji Fukuda, Leone M. Schmeltz, Helen L. Regnery, Henrietta E. Hall, Nancy J. Cox, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases

    Surveillance for lyme disease--United States, 1992-1998: "PROBLEM/CONDITION: Lyme disease is caused by infection with the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi and is the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in the United States. Borrelia burgdorferi is transmitted to humans by infected Ixodes scapularis and I. pacificus ticks. Lyme disease is typically evidenced in its early stage by a characteristic rash (erythema migrans), accompanied by nonspecific symptoms (e.g., fever, malaise, fatigue, headache, myalgia, and arthralgia). Lyme disease can usually be treated successfully with standard antibiotic regimens. REPORTING PERIOD: 1992-1998. DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: Lyme disease surveillance data are reported to CDC through the National Electronic Telecommunication System for Surveillance, a computerized public health database for nationally notifiable diseases. During 1992-1998, data regarding reported cases of Lyme disease included county and state of residence, age, sex, and date of onset. Descriptive analyses were performed, and cumulative incidence by state, county, age group, and sex were calculated. RESULTS: During 1992-1998, a total of 88,967 cases of Lyme disease was reported to CDC by 49 states and the District of Columbia, with the number of cases increasing from 9,896 in 1992 to 16,802 in 1998. A total of 92% of cases was reported from eight northeastern and mid-Atlantic states and two north-central states. Children aged 5-9 years and adults aged 45-54 years had the highest mean annual incidence. INTERPRETATION: Lyme disease is a highly focal disease, with the majority of reported cases occurring in the northeastern and north-central United States. The number of reported cases of Lyme disease increased during 1992-1998. Geographic and seasonal patterns of disease correlate with the distribution and feeding habits of the vector ticks, I. scapularis and I. pacificus. PUBLIC HEALTH ACTION: The results presented in this report will help clinicians evaluate the prior probability of Lyme disease and provide the framework for targeting human Lyme disease vaccine use and other prevention and treatment interventions." - p. 1

    Surveillance for influenza--United States, 1994-95, 1995-96, and 1996-97 seasons: "PROBLEM/CONDITION: Influenza epidemics occur nearly every year during the winter months and are responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality in the United States, including an average of approximately 114,000 hospitalizations and 20,000 deaths per year. REPORTING PERIOD: This report summarizes U.S. influenza surveillance data from October 1994 through May 1997, from both active and passive surveillance systems. DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: During the period covered, CDC received weekly reports from October through May from a) state and territorial epidemiologists on estimates of local influenza activity, b) approximately 140 sentinel physicians on their total number of patient visits and the number of cases of influenza-like illness (ILI), and c) approximately 70 World Health Organization (WHO) collaborating laboratories in the United States on weekly influenza virus isolations. WHO collaborating laboratories also submitted influenza isolates to CDC for antigenic analysis. Throughout the year, vital statistics offices in 121 cities reported deaths related to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) weekly, providing a measure of the impact of influenza on mortality. RESULTS: During the 1994-95 influenza season, 25 state epidemiologists reported regional or widespread activity at the peak of the season. Cases of ILI reported by sentinel physicians exceeded baseline levels for 4 weeks, peaking at 5%. Influenza A(H3N2) was the most frequently isolated influenza virus type/subtype. The longest period of sustained excess mortality was 5 consecutive weeks, when the percentage of deaths attributed to P&I exceeded the epidemic threshold, peaking at 7.6%. During the 1995-96 season, 33 state epidemiologists reported regional or widespread activity at the peak of the season. ILI cases exceeded baseline levels for 5 weeks, peaking at 7%. Influenza A(H1N1) viruses predominated, although influenza A(H3N2) and influenza B viruses also were identified throughout the United States. P&I mortality exceeded the epidemic threshold for 6 consecutive weeks, peaking at 8.2%. The 1996-97 season was the most severe of the three seasons summarized in this report. Thirty-nine state epidemiologists reported regional or widespread activity at the peak of the season. ILI reports exceeded baseline levels for 5 consecutive weeks, peaking at 7%. The proportion of respiratory specimens positive for influenza peaked at 34%, with influenza A(H3N2) viruses predominating. Influenza B viruses were identified throughout the United States, but only one influenza A(H1N1) virus isolate was reported overall. The proportion of deaths attributed to P&I exceeded the epidemic threshold for 10 consecutive weeks, peaking at 9.1%. INTERPRETATION: Influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2), and B viruses circulated during 1994-1997. Local surveillance data are important because of geographic and temporal differences in the circulation of influenza types/subtypes. PUBLIC HEALTH ACTIONS: CDC conducts active national surveillance annually from October through May for influenza to detect the emergence and spread of influenza virus variants and monitor the impact of influenza-related morbidity and mortality. Surveillance data are provided weekly throughout the influenza season to public health officials, WHO, and health-care providers and can be used to guide prevention and control activities, vaccine strain selection, and patient care." - p. 13

  • Document Type:
  • Place as Subject:
  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
No Related Documents.
You May Also Like: