Welcome to CDC Stacks | Electronic media and youth violence; a CDC issue brief for educators and caregivers - 7032 | Stephen B. Thacker CDC Library collection | Guidelines and Recommendations
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Electronic media and youth violence; a CDC issue brief for educators and caregivers
  • Published Date:
    2008
  • Status:
    current
Filetype[PDF - 5.50 MB]


This document cannot be previewed automatically as it exceeds 5 MB
Please click the thumbnail image to view the document.
Electronic media and youth violence; a CDC issue brief for educators and caregivers
Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.), Coordinating Center for Environmental Health and Injury and Prevention., Adolescent Goals Team. ; National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (U.S.) ; National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (U.S.)
  • Description:
    "Technology and adolescents seem destined for each other; both are young, fast paced, and ever changing. In previous generations teens readily embraced new technologies, such as record players, TVs, cassette players, computers, and VCRs, but the past two decades have witnessed a virtual explosion in new technology, including cell phones, iPods, MP-3s, DVDs, and PDAs (personal digital assistants). This new technology has been eagerly embraced by adolescents and has led to an expanded vocabulary, including instant messaging ("IMing"), blogging, and text messaging. New technology has many social and educational benefi ts, but caregivers and educators have expressed concern about the dangers young people can be exposed to through these technologies. To respond to this concern, some states and school districts have, for example, established policies about the use of cell phones on school grounds and developed policies to block access to certain websites on school computers. Many teachers and caregivers have taken action individually by spot-checking websites used by young people, such as MySpace. This brief focuses on the phenomena of electronic aggression: any kind of aggression perpetrated through technology--any type of harassment or bullying (teasing, telling lies, making fun of someone, making rude or mean comments, spreading rumors, or making threatening or aggressive comments) that occurs through email, a chat room, instant messaging, a website (including blogs), or text messaging. Caregivers, educators, and other adults who work with young people know that children and adolescents spend a lot of time using electronic media (blogs, instant messaging, chat rooms, email, text messaging). What is not known is exactly how and how often they use different types of technology. Could use of technology increase the likelihood that a young person is the victim of aggression? If the answer is yes, what should caregivers and educators do to help young people protect themselves? To help answer these questions, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health and Division of Violence Prevention, held an expert panel on September 20-21, 2006, in Atlanta, Georgia, entitled "Electronic Media and Youth Violence." There were 13 panelists (see addendum for listing), who came from academic institutions, federal agencies, a school system, and nonprofit organizations who were already engaged in work focusing on electronic media and youth violence. The panelists presented information about if, how, and how often technology is used by young people to behave aggressively. They also presented information about the qualities that make a young person more or less likely to be victimized or to behave aggressively toward someone else electronically." - p. 1

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files