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Diagnosed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and learning disability, United States, 2004-2006; data from the National Health Interview Survey
  • Published Date:
    July 2008
Filetype[PDF - 327.49 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Health Interview Survey (U.S.) ; National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.), Office of Analysis and Epidemiology. ;
  • Pubmed ID:
    18998276
  • Series:
    Vital and health statistics. Series 10, Data from the National Health Survey ; no. 237
    DHHS publication ; no. (PHS) 2008-1565
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    "Objectives: This report presents national estimates of the prevalence of diagnosed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disability (LD) in U.S. children 6-17 years of age and describes the prevalence of these conditions for children with selected characteristics. The use of educational and health care services and the prevalence of other health conditions are contrasted for children with ADHD without LD, LD without ADHD, both conditions, and neither condition. Methods: Estimates are based on data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), an ongoing national household survey of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States. The analysis focuses on 23,051 children 6-17 years of age in the child sample of the 2004, 2005, and 2006 NHIS. Results: About 5% of children had ADHD without LD, 5% had LD without ADHD, and 4% had both conditions. Boys were more likely than girls to have each of the diagnoses (ADHD without LD, LD without ADHD, and both conditions). Children 12-17 years of age were more likely than children 6-11 years of age to have each of the diagnoses. Hispanic children were less likely than non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black children to have ADHD (with and without LD). Children with Medicaid coverage were more likely than uninsured children and privately insured children to have each of the diagnoses. Children with each of the diagnoses were more likely than children with neither ADHD nor LD to have other health conditions. Children with ADHD were more likely than children without ADHD to have contact with a mental health professional, use prescription medication, and have frequent health care visits. Children with LD were more likely than children without LD to use special education services." - p. 1

  • Supporting Files:
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