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Autopsy patterns in 2003
  • Published Date:
    March 2007
Filetype[PDF - 743.47 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.), Division of Vital Statistics.
  • Pubmed ID:
    25314591
  • Series:
    Vital and health statistics. Series 20, Data from the national vital statistics system ; no. 32
    DHHS publication ; no. (PHS) 2007-1851
    Vital and health statistics. Series 20, Data from the national vital statistics system ; no. 32
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    This report presents information on autopsy data in 2003 and compares data for 1993 and 2003. Methods-Death certificates are completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners. The original records are filed in the state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled into a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. This report focuses on the autopsy item on the death certificate and presents descriptive tabulations. Results-In 2003, autopsies were performed for 7.7 percent of deaths occurring in 47 states and the District of Columbia. This was less than in 1994, when the data was last available in this database. Decedents with particular characteristics were more likely to be autopsied than others. For example, almost one-third of infant deaths, more than one-half of decedents aged 15-24 years, and almost none of the decedents aged 85 years and over were autopsied.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files