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Treating opportunistic infections among HIV-exposed and infected children; recommendations from the Ceters for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America
  • Published Date:
    December 3, 2004
Filetype[PDF - 742.29 KB]


Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.) ; Infectious Diseases Society of America ; National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention (U.S.) ; ... More ▼
  • Pubmed ID:
    15577752
  • Description:
    Introduction -- -- Treatment Recommendations by Organism -- Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly carinii) Pneumonia -- Toxoplasmosis -- Cryptosporidiosis/Microsporidiosis -- Mycobacterium tuberculosis -- Mycobacterium avium Complex Disease -- Serious and Recurrent Bacterial Infections -- Syphilis -- Candida Infections -- Cryptococcosis -- Histoplasmosis -- Coccidioidomycosis -- Cytomegalovirus -- Herpes simplex Virus -- Varicella-Zoster Virus -- Human Papillomavirus -- Hepatitis C -- Hepatitis B -- -- References -- Appendix A: Recommendations for treatment of opportunistic infections among HIV-exposed and -infected infants and children -- Appendix B: Preparations and major toxicities of common drugs used for treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV-infected children -- Appendix C: Drug interactions of clinical significance

    "In 2001, CDC, the National Institutes of Health, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America convened a working group to develop guidelines for therapy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated opportunistic infections to serve as a companion to the Guidelines for Prevention of Opportunistic Infections Among HIV-Infected Persons. In recognition of unique considerations related to HIV infection among infants, children, and adolescents, a separate pediatric working group was established. Because HIV-infected women coinfected with opportunistic pathogens might be more likely to transmit these infections to their infants than women without HIV infection, guidelines for treating opportunistic pathogens among children should consider treatment of congentially acquired infections among both HIV-exposed but uninfected children and those with HIV infection. In addition, the natural history of opportunistic infections among HIV-infected children might differ from that among adults. Compared with opportunistic infections among HIV-infected adults, which are often caused by reactivation of pathogens acquired before HIV infection when host immunity was intact, opportunistic infections among children often reflect primary acquisition of the pathogen and, among children with perinatal HIV infection, infection acquired after HIV infection has been established and begun to compromise an already immature immune system. Laboratory diagnosis of opportunistic infections can be more difficult with children. Finally, treatment recommendations should consider differences between adults and children in terms of drug pharmacokinetics, dosing, formulations, administration, and toxicities. This report focuses on treatment of opportunistic infections that are common in HIV-exposed and infected infants, children, and adolescents in the United States." - p. 1

    Published also as: Clinical infectious diseases ; v. 40, suppl. 1.

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 52-63).

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