Welcome to CDC Stacks | Health status of non-hispanic U.S.-born and foreigh-born black and white persons; United States, 1992-95 : data from the National Health Interview Survey - 6653 | Stephen B. Thacker CDC Library collection
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Health status of non-hispanic U.S.-born and foreigh-born black and white persons; United States, 1992-95 : data from the National Health Interview Survey
  • Published Date:
    July 2005
Filetype[PDF - 668.84 KB]


Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Health Interview Survey (U.S.) ; National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.) ;
  • Pubmed ID:
    16089101
  • Series:
    Vital and health statistics. Series 10, Data from the National Health Survey ; no. 226
    DHHS publication ; no. (PHS) 2005-1554
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Object: This report describes differences in selected sociodemographic and health characteristics of the non-Hispanic U.S. population by race (black and white) and nativity (U.S-born and foreign-born), using data from the 1992-95 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS).

    Methods: Data were collected for a household, multistage probability sample representative of the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population. A total of 456,729 persons were included in these analyses for the 4 data years combined. Statistics were age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population, and unadjusted estimates are also presented for comparison.

    Results: Over 87 percent of the foreign-born black population assessed their health as being excellent or very good, significantly higher than U.S.-born black persons (52 percent), and similar to U.S.- and foreign-born white persons (69 percent for each group). Eleven percent of foreign-born black persons were limited in performing some type of activity, compared with 20 percent of their U.S.-born counterparts. Among white persons, 14 percent of foreign-born and 16 percent of U.S.-born individuals were limited in activity. The foreign-born black population, especially women, had the lowest current smoking prevalence of all of the study groups.

    Conclusions: The data show significant differences in health characteristics between groups classified by race and nativity. Information about the nativity status of black and white populations may be useful in public health efforts to eliminate health disparities

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files