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Risk factors associated with invasive orthopaedic interventions in males with haemophilia enrolled in the Universal Data Collection program from 2000 to 2010
  • Published Date:
    Jun 29 2018
  • Source:
    Haemophilia. 24(6):964-970.
  • Language:
    English


Public Access Version Available on: November 01, 2019 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    29957840
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC6261689
  • Description:
    Background:

    Invasive orthopaedic interventions (IOI) are often used to control recurrent haemarthrosis, pain and loss of joint function, in males with haemophilia (Factor VIII and Factor IX deficiency).

    Aim:

    Identify risk factors associated with IOIs in males with haemophilia enrolled in the Universal Data Collection (UDC) surveillance program from 2000 until 2010.

    Methods:

    Data were collected on IOIs performed on patients receiving care in 130 haemophilia treatment centers in the United States annually by health care providers using standardized forms. IOIs included in this study are as follows: 1) synovectomy and 2) arthrodesis or arthroplasty (A/A). Information about potential risk factors was obtained from the preceding UDC visit if available, or from the same visit if not. Patients with no reported IOI at any of their UDC visits were the reference group for the analysis. Multivariate analyses were conducted to identify independent risk factors for synovectomies and arthrodesis/arthroplasty.

    Results:

    Risk factors significantly associated with the two IOI categories were age, student status, haemophilia severity, number of joint bleeds within the last 6 months, HIV or hepatitis C (HCV) status. Multivariate analyses showed patients on continuous prophylaxis were 50% less likely to have had a synovectomy and were 40% less likely to have an A/A.

    Conclusions:

    This study shows modifiable risk factors, including management of bleeding episodes with a continuous prophylactic treatment schedule are associated with a decreased likelihood of IOIs in males with haemophilia.

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