CERC : psychology of a crisis
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CERC : psychology of a crisis

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    • Alternative Title:
      CERC : psychology of a crisis ; Crisis + Emergency Risk Communication : psychology of a crisis ; Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication : psychology of a crisis ;
    • Description:
      Chapter of the CERC manual showing: • The four ways people process information during a crisis • Mental states during a disaster, such as uncertainty, helplessness, and hopelessness • Risk perception and behaviors Crises, emergencies, and disasters happen. Disasters are different from personal and family emergencies, and not just because they are larger in scale. Disasters that take a toll on human life are characterized by change, high levels of uncertainty, and complexity.1 In a crisis, affected people take in information, process information, and act on information differently than they would during non-crisis times.2,3 People or groups may exaggerate their communication responses. They may revert to more basic or instinctive fight-or-flight reasoning. Effective communication during a crisis is not an attempt at mass mental therapy, nor is it a magic potion that fixes all problems. Nonetheless, to reduce the psychological impact of a crisis, the public should feel empowered to take actions that will reduce their risk of harm. This chapter will briefly describe how people process information differently during a crisis, the mental states and behaviors that tend to emerge in crises, how psychological effects are different in each phase of a crisis, and how to communicate to best reach people during these changing states of mind. CS249215-A CERC_Psychology_of_a_Crisis.pdf
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