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A Story of impact; NIOSH list of hazardous drugs in healthcare settings allows healthcare workers to minimize exposure and reduce health risks
  • Published Date:
    August 2011
Filetype[PDF - 757.69 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
  • Series:
    DHHS publication ; no. (NIOSH) 2011-189
  • Description:
    "Modern society is fortunate to have powerful treatments available for a wide range of medical conditions. However, some useful medications can also have serious side effects. When using these drugs for medical treatment, doctors carefully control the dose and monitor the patient to minimize harmful consequences. But the doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and other healthcare workers who handle these medications are also being exposed and may also demonstrate adverse health effects. Hazardous drugs include drugs used for chemotherapy, antiviral drugs, hormones, and some immunosuppressant drugs - all of which may have damaging effects on the body. When these drugs must be prepared and administered, there are workplace best practices that can minimize potentially harmful exposure. These include the use of engineering controls such as biological safety cabinets, closed system transfer devices, needleless systems, and personal protective equipment such as gloves, masks, and gowns. In order to use this equipment appropriately and effectively, healthcare workers need to know which drugs pose a hazard. Starting in 2000, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) began working with multiple partners and stakeholders to address the issue of occupational exposure to hazardous drugs. The NIOSH Hazardous Drug Committee - with representatives from nursing and pharmacy professional associations, federal agencies, pharmaceutical companies, health and safety professionals, manufacturers of safety equipment, and academia - developed recommendations for how to minimize exposure when working with hazardous drugs." - NIOSHTIC-2

    On back: Logo for the Research to Practice at NIOSH initiative (r2p).

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files