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Receipt and effectiveness of influenza vaccination reminders for adults, 2011‐2012 season, United States
  • Published Date:
    Apr 22 2018
  • Source:
    Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 12(5):605-612.
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-360.70 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    29681127
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC6086857
  • Description:
    Background

    Reminders for influenza vaccination improve influenza vaccination coverage. The purpose of this study was to describe the receipt of reminders for influenza vaccination during the 2011‐12 influenza season among US adults.

    Methods

    We analyzed data from the March 2012 National Flu Survey (NFS), a random digit dial telephone survey of adults in the United States. Relative to July 1, 2011, respondents were asked whether they received a reminder for influenza vaccination and the source and type of reminder they received. The association between reminder receipt and demographic variables, and the association between influenza vaccination coverage and receipt of reminders were also examined.

    Results

    Of adults interviewed, 17.2% reported receiving a reminder since July 1, 2011. More than half (65.2%) of the reminders were sent by doctor offices. Hispanics and non‐Hispanic blacks were more likely than non‐Hispanic whites to report receiving a reminder. Adults who reported having a usual healthcare provider, health insurance, or a high‐risk condition were more likely to report receiving reminders than the respective reference group. Adults reporting receipt of reminders were 1.15 times more likely (adjusted prevalence ratio, 95% CI: 1.06‐1.25) to report being vaccinated for influenza than adults reporting not receiving reminders.

    Conclusions

    Differences exist in receipt of influenza vaccination reminders among adults. Reminders are important tools to improve adult influenza vaccination coverage. Greater use of reminders may lead to higher rates of adult influenza vaccination coverage and reductions in influenza‐related morbidity.

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