Cancers associated with human papillomavirus, United States—2011–2015
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      Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a recognized cause of cancer. Although most HPV infections are asymptomatic and clear spontaneously, persistent infections can progress to precancer or cancer. HPV causes most cervical cancers, as well as some cancers of the vagina, vulva, penis, anus, and oropharynx (cancers of the back of the throat, including the base of the tongue and tonsils). Cancer registries do not routinely collect information about HPV status, so in this report, HPV-associated cancers are defined as those that occur in parts of the body where HPV is often found. For more information about: HPV: https://www.cdc.gov/STD/HPV/STDFact-HPV.htm HPV vaccines: https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/vaccine.html HPV cancers:https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/hpv/ Suggested citation Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cancers associated with human papillomavirus, United States—2011–2015 USCS data brief, no. 4. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2018 CS295698 USCS-DataBrief-No4-August2018-508.pdf
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