DIFFERENT TYPES OF INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE LIKELY REQUIRE DIFFERENT TYPES OF APPROACHES TO PREVENTION: A RESPONSE TO BUZAWA AND BUZAWA
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.

Search our Collections & Repository

All these words:

For very narrow results

This exact word or phrase:

When looking for a specific result

Any of these words:

Best used for discovery & interchangable words

None of these words:

Recommended to be used in conjunction with other fields

Language:

Dates

Publication Date Range:

to

Document Data

Title:

Document Type:

Library

Collection:

Series:

People

Author:

Help
Clear All

Add terms to the query box

Query box

Help
Clear All
i

DIFFERENT TYPES OF INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE LIKELY REQUIRE DIFFERENT TYPES OF APPROACHES TO PREVENTION: A RESPONSE TO BUZAWA AND BUZAWA

Filetype[PDF-32.50 KB]



Details:

  • Alternative Title:
    J Policy Anal Manage
  • Description:
    Buzawa and Buzawa (this issue) assert that there are different typologies of intimate partner violence (IPV) defined by the extent to which the violence is part of a general pattern of coercive control. They center their discussion on batterers, who are understood to be responsible for the most severe forms of abuse and injury. Economic factors are believed to be "only a weak predictor of violence" in these cases. Thus, they argue that, in the face of severe budget constraints, there is a need to focus on the chronically violent offender and support-coordinated services for IPV victims. We agree that there are different types of IPV distinguishable by the extent to which the violence is occurring within a pattern of general coercive control and that each type has different risk and protective factors. We also agree economic factors interact with other factors in complex ways and vary in the extent to which they predict different types of IPV. However, we argue economic factors should not be ignored as an important strategy in preventing situational couple violence (SCV) and helping victims to escape from intimate terrorists (ITs). Relying on response (rather than prevention) strategies, such as coordinated community response-for which there is limited evidence of effectiveness-is unlikely to significantly impact rates of all types of IPV.
  • Subject:
  • Pubmed ID:
    29853730
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5973801
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Main Document Checksum:
  • File Type:

Supporting Files

More +

You May Also Like

Checkout today's featured content at stacks.cdc.gov